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Happy Mother’s Day!

13 May

Here’s to the Moms out there today!

Here’s my Grandmother, my Dad, and my Uncle:

And here’s my Grandmother, my Mother, and unidentified friends:

My GreatGrandmother, Grandmother, Mother and Sister:

My Sister with her two sons:

And, my Mother-In-Law, with her first son – Froggy!

Happy Mother’s Day, everyone!

xoxo,

SAllan

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A Photographer’s Rights

29 Jan

Here’s a sign that I really HATE to see:

“No Smoking.”

I get that.

Cancer, second-hand smoke, etc. Okay – I get that.

“No Photography.”

Not so much…

“No Flash During Performance” – yes, I get that. “No Disruptions During Performance” – check.

But, this sign makes it look that that’s a “Bad Camera“. Sigh.

Here’s another sign that I despise:

“No Photos Of Photos.”

What the heck?!

Post this sign – and then you just try to stop me!

I’ll take the photo – if you ask me I’ll answer:

“I’m taking a picture of your stupid sign – not your precious photos.”

Oh, I’m on a roll.

The other day I was walking past a fabric store, and I had to stop and gaze admiringly at this bolt of fabric which was in the window:

I mean, it’s so GREAT on so many levels!

It’s dangerously cheesy.

How would you utilize this fabric? Would you make curtains? Sheets? A table cloth? A shirt?

I HAD to take a photo of this great fabric!

I pulled out my trusty camera and snapped a quick shot. Then, through the window I saw the shop owner coming towards me through the door.

As he opened the door and came towards me telling me “No Photos!” I turned my back and kept on walking.

One day I’ll get into an altercation, if I don’t watch myself.

I used to be sweet.

Not so much, anymore.

Here’s an interesting, informative article about Photographers’ Rights. From USA Today, in part it reads:

Last week I received a note from a reader:

“Today I was stopped by a security guard with the North County Transit District in Solana Beach, California, and prevented from taking photos of a great new train station they have,” he wrote. “The guard said they don’t allow it since 9/11.”

Note to security guard: Just because you or your boss “don’t allow” something doesn’t mean it’s not legal. I can post a sign on my lawn, “Hopping on one foot in front of this house is prohibited,” but I’ll have a tough time enforcing it.

The law in the United States of America is pretty simple. You are allowed to photograph anything with the following exceptions:

• Certain military installations or operations.

• People who have a reasonable expectation of privacy. That is, people who are some place that’s not easily visible to the general public, e.g., if you shoot through someone’s window with a telephoto lens.

That’s it.

There are a few more restrictions on publishing photos or video, though.

You can’t show private facts — things a reasonable person wouldn’t want made public — unless those facts were revealed publicly. So no long-lens shots of your neighbors’ odd habits.

You also can’t show someone in a negative false light by, for example, using Photoshop tricks or a nasty, untrue caption.

And you can’t put someone else’s likeness to commercial use without their permission. This is usually mentioned in terms of celebrities, but it applies to making money from anyone’s likeness.”

SO THERE, YOU STORE OWNER!

What is in your window is apt to be photographed when an admiring photographer is outside on the sidewalk.

And that’s legal.

If you don’t want your fabulous fabric to be photographed, then don’t display it in your window.

Photographers – go to this site and read about your rights here in the United States. The author suggests that you download the PDF – print it out and keep it with you. The author is an attorney; here is the “about him” from his site:

Bert Krages is an attorney who concentrates on intellectual property and environmental law. He is recognized nationally as an advocate of the right to take photographs in public places, having appeared in media such as National Public Radio’s Morning Edition, Popular Photography, Shutterbug, and Wired.”

The beginning of the article says: “The general rule in the United States is that anyone may take photographs of whatever they want when they are in a public place… Examples of places that are traditionally considered public are streets, sidewalks, and public parks.”

Okay. I feel better now.

: )

xoxo,

SAllan

My Parents – I Think I’ll Keep Them!

28 Jan

Do you remember the Geritol commercials from the 70’s where the husband concludes:

“My wife – I think I’ll keep her!”

If you can find it on YouTube, please share the link. I have searched for it, to no avail.

I DID find this one, which is pretty great (get through the first 30 seconds for the Geritol commercial):

Anyway, I have recently been scanning in some old family photos, an I MUST share these two.

My Mom and Dad – back in 1967:

 

My parents – I think I’ll keep them!

xoxo,

SAllan

Imagine

22 Jan

Just the other day I was walking on West 57th Street near Carnegie Hall and I passed Steinway Hall.

Or, I should say that I passed Steinway Hall – did a quick double take – then backtracked to stare into their window.

For those of you desiring a bit of history, info and trivia:

Steinway & Sons is a premier piano manufacturing company; their handmade pianos are regarded by many to be the finest in the world.

Papa Steinway (Heinrich Engelhard Steinweg) started making pianos in his German kitchen in 1836. He and his family emigrated to the United States 1n 1850.

According to Wikipedia:

In 1853, H.E. Steinweg founded Steinway & Sons. His first workshop was in a small loft at the back of 85 Varick Street in the Manhattan district of New York City. The first piano produced by Steinway & Sons was given the number 483 because H.E. Steinweg had built 482 pianos in Germany. Number 483 was sold to a New York family for $500, and is now displayed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

Cool, very cool! I want to go see that first American Steinway piano #483 at The Met!!

More from our friends at Wikipedia:

Steinway Hall  is the name given to buildings housing concert halls, showrooms and sales departments for Steinway pianos. In 1864 William Steinway (the son of H. E. Steinway, who is credited with establishing Steinway’s remarkable success in marketing) built a set of elegant new showrooms housing more than 100 pianos on East 14th Street in Manhattan, New York City. In 1866, William Steinway oversaw the construction of the first Steinway Hall to the rear of the showrooms.

The Steinway Hall seated more than 2,000 and quickly became an important part of New York City’s cultural life, housing the New York Philharmonic for the next 25 years until Carnegie Hall opened in 1891.

Concertgoers had to pass through the piano showrooms; this had a remarkable effect on sales, increasing demand for new pianos by four hundred in 1867 alone.”

Brilliant marketing!!

From the plaque on the 57th Street building, in part:

Steinway Hall was constructed in 1924-25… After Carnegie Hall opened in 1891, West 57th Street gradually became one of the nation’s leading cultural music centers. Steinway & Sons followed this trend, relocating to this area from East 14th Street… Steinway & Sons continues to be the city’s only remaining piano maker.”

It’s interesting to me that neither the entry in Wikipedia or the historic information on the Steinway & Sons website mention the move to West 57th Street. I wonder why??

Well, a bit of interesting Steinway/WWII trivia, again from our friends at Wikipedia:

During World War II the Steinway factory in New York City received orders from the Allied Armies to build wooden gliders to convey troops behind enemy lines. Few normal pianos could be made, but some 3,000 special models were built by Steinway, the Victory Vertical or G.I. Piano. It was a small piano, able to be lifted by four men, painted olive drab, gray or blue, designed to be carried aboard ships or dropped by parachute from an airplane, in order to bring music to the soldiers.”

Amazing, to think of pianos being parachuted out of planes, during the war!

Anyway, back to what draw my attention in the showroom window:

The John Lennon “Imagine” Series Limited Edition piano.

The sign in the window reads:

To commemorate the 70th birthday of a true creative genius – legendary musician and songwriter John Lennon – Steinway & Sons proudly introduced the “Imagine” Series Limited Edition piano. Modeled after the white Steinway that John presented to Yoko Ono on her birthday in 1971, this piano incorporates John’s drawings, signature, music and lyrics. Each piano bears a medallion indicating its uniqueness. “Imagine” was composed on a Steinway piano, and today the connection lives on through a piano that is a tribute to the man, the music and the message.”

“Excellent!” I thought. But then I thought, “John Lennon was born in 1940. He was 40 years old when he was murdered in 1980.”

I guess this sign and this piano have been here in the Steinway widow for a couple of years.

Brilliant marketing!!

Well, it made me stop and look! And who knows? If I had oodles of money (and space), maybe I’d be tempted to buy one of these Limited Edition pianos.

BUT, on the Steinway & Sons website pertaining to this series, the page is blank.

Have they have sold out of the series? Either way, they seriously need to update their website.

Anyway – before this post’s grand finale – here is one more bit of trivia about John’s white Steinway piano, again from Wikipedia:

The world’s most expensive upright piano was built by Steinway’s factory in Hamburg, Germany, in 1970. The piano was bought by John Lennon for $1,500; Lennon composed and recorded “Imagine” and other tunes on it. In 2000, it was sold at auction by a private British collector. Pop musician George Michael made the winning bid of £1.67 million.”

I don’t know what that was in 2000 conversion rates, but in today’s market, 1.67 million pounds (GBP) converts to about 2.60 million dollars (USD)!

Ponder that while you listen to this:

“Imagine” – By John Lennon, 1971

Imagine there’s no heaven
It’s easy if you try
No hell below us
Above us only sky
Imagine all the people living for today

Imagine there’s no countries
It isn’t hard to do
Nothing to kill or die for
And no religion too
Imagine all the people living life in peace

You, you may say 
I’m a dreamer, but I’m not the only one
I hope some day you’ll join us
And the world will be as one

Imagine no possessions
I wonder if you can
No need for greed or hunger
A brotherhood of man
Imagine all the people sharing all the world

You, you may say 
I’m a dreamer, but I’m not the only one
I hope some day you’ll join us
And the world will live as one

xoxo,

SAllan

 

 

A Sad Day For Photographers (And Advertising Lovers) – Kodak Files Chapter 11

19 Jan

Kodak was founded by George Eastman in 1880. The company made photography a household word.

From cameras, to film, chemicals, paper – and up to the digital age – Who could ever have guessed that Kodak could fail?

According to Wikipedia, : “As late as 1976, Kodak commanded 90% of film sales and 85% of camera sales in the U.S.

Kodak failed to anticipate how fast digital cameras would become commodities, with low profit margins, as more companies entered the market in the mid-2000s. Also, an ever-smaller percentage of digital pictures were being taken on digital cameras, being gradually displaced in the late 2000s by cellphones and tablets’ cameras.”

According to Kodak’s website:

On January 19, 2012, Eastman Kodak Company and its U.S. subsidiaries filed voluntary petitions for Chapter 11 business reorganization in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York. The business reorganization will enable Kodak to bolster liquidity in the U.S. and abroad, monetize non-strategic intellectual property, fairly resolve legacy liabilities, and enable the Company to focus on its most valuable business lines.

Kodak and its U.S. subsidiaries intend to continue normal business operations during the reorganization…Kodak aims to build company that will be successful in the marketplace – and a positive force in the communities we call home.”

I grew up with Kodak, and I always loved the Kodak advertising.

Vintage Kodak ads had a warm feel – family, friends, fun! And of course, travel.

Here are some Kodak ads throughout the century. 100 years of Kodak!

No date, but obviously a very early ad:

From 1917:

1922 (from Canada):

1926:

1937:

During WWII in the 1940’s:

After the war, in 1949:

1950:

1962:

1965:

And in the 70’s, with spokesmen like Michael Landon:

and Dick Van Dyke:

Up to current times, with Rihanna in 2010:

Good luck, Kodak!

Wikipedia says: “From the $90 range in 1997, Kodak shares closed at 76 cents on January 3, 2012.”

It’s an uphill climb!!!

xoxo,

SAllan

Vintage Greenhouse Photographs And Postcards

15 Jan

It’s cold outside this weekend! To warm me up, I started thinking about summertime.

Which made me think of flowers.

Which made me think of growing up in greenhouses.

My Dad was a horticulturist – here were some of his greenhouses:

My sister and I grew up playing – then working – in the greenhouses.

I guess now greenhouses and flowers are in my blood.

And photography is under my skin.

Combining a couple of my loves, I’ve begun collecting a few vintage photographs of people in greenhouses. I’d like to share a few of them with you, if you’ll indulge me…

Here’s one from 1870:

And here’s one from 1898:

 I don’t know the date of this one, but I like the gentleman with the pipe:

And these children, with their “Christmas Wishes”:

I also have a few vintage greenhouse postcards, such as this one from Grant Park in Atlanta:

And this one from Central Park in New York City:

I hope that you’ve enjoyed this trip into Greenhouses Past.

The vintage photos and cards warm my very heart and soul. If not my fingers!  🙂

xoxo,

SAllan

Time For Reflections

10 Jan

At the beginning of a new year, it’s common to reflect back upon one’s past year.

What’s working nicely? What might best be changed?

As a photographer though, “reflections” take me to a whole other place…

There’s always an interesting reflection nearby, if I take the time to see it.

Car windows are fantastic “mirrors”.

As, of course, are water puddles.

Here are Hubby and I, looking rather “American Gothic”.

And another reflective view me (and do you see Hubby in the center? This one is a little freaky!):

In a furniture showroom:

Another puddle reflection:

A store-front window:

Snapped while browsing our local weekend street fair:

Winter trees:

Life is pretty good. I don’t think I’d change too much… maybe just one or two little things…

I can’t think of reflections, without thinking of one of my favorite songs from around 1970.

Reflections Of My Life, by The Marmalade.

What are you reflecting upon today?

xoxo,

SAllan

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